NMDA receptor antagonism with novel indolyl, 2-(1,1-Dimethyl-1,3-dihydro-benzo[e]indol-2-ylidene)-malonaldehyde, reduces seizures duration in a rat model of epilepsy

Rothan, H.A. and Amini, E. and Faraj, F.L. and Golpich, M. and Teoh, T.C. and Gholami, K. and Yusof, R. (2017) NMDA receptor antagonism with novel indolyl, 2-(1,1-Dimethyl-1,3-dihydro-benzo[e]indol-2-ylidene)-malonaldehyde, reduces seizures duration in a rat model of epilepsy. Scientific Reports, 7 (1). p. 45540. ISSN 2045-2322

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep45540

Abstract

N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) play a central role in epileptogensis and NMDAR antagonists have been shown to have antiepileptic effects in animals and humans. Despite significant progress in the development of antiepileptic therapies over the previous 3 decades, a need still exists for novel therapies. We screened an in-house library of small molecules targeting the NMDA receptor. A novel indolyl compound, 2-(1,1-Dimethyl-1,3-dihydro-benzo[e]indol-2-ylidene)-malonaldehyde, (DDBM) showed the best binding with the NMDA receptor and computational docking data showed that DDBM antagonised the binding sites of the NMDA receptor at lower docking energies compared to other molecules. Using a rat electroconvulsive shock (ECS) model of epilepsy we showed that DDBM decreased seizure duration and improved the histological outcomes. Our data show for the first time that indolyls like DDBM have robust anticonvulsive activity and have the potential to be developed as novel anticonvulsants.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors; Rat; Epilepsy
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
R Medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine
Faculty of Science
Depositing User: Ms. Juhaida Abd Rahim
Date Deposited: 30 Aug 2018 06:04
Last Modified: 30 Aug 2018 06:04
URI: http://eprints.um.edu.my/id/eprint/19038

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